George Cutts

British Sculptor

When I left the Royal College of Art, having studied figurative modelling and stone carving, I began wrapping stainless steel in carved stone, which I have continued throughout my career. The opposing materials with such diverse textural qualities interplay, emphasising my ideas. I play one off against the other, which I have taken through into my mobiles, the reaction creating optical illusions, playing with shapes in space. The inspiration and theme for all my sculptures is landscape, plant growth, light and water.

Storm King Art Center features in Netflix hit 'Master of None'

The prestigious Storm King Art Center, undoubtedly the most beautiful Sculpture Park in New York, has reached vast new audiences after featuring in a romantic scene on Anziz Ansari's widely known Netflix TV show 'Master of None'. Anziz Ansari's episode nine of the second season shows a glowing endorsement of Storm King. Ansari has been known for choosing particularly evocative locations, and it was Ansari's own initiative to film at Storm King Art Center for this production. Having a hit TV show on such a popular platform as Netflix inevitably does wonders for both attendance, and diversifying the audience of the sculpture park.

“Aziz Ansari has really broken down some accessibility walls for us, in terms of how easy it is to get to Storm King, and how beautiful it is once when you get here,” according to Anthony Davidowitz, Deputy Director of Operations, Administration, and Legal Affairs for the museum. “[People think] ‘If it’s a beautiful, easy day trip for Aziz on Master of None, then it’s a beautiful, easy day trip for me to make with my friends." - Artsy

 Image Courtesy of Netflix

Image Courtesy of Netflix

Though the piece did not feature in the 'Master of None' episode, George Cutts' kinetic stainless steel sculpture 'Sea Change' remains located within the grounds of Storm King Art Center. 'Sea Change' comprises of two identical stainless steel poles that turn slowly in opposite directions, moving ambiguously. 

 

"The slow, synchronized rotations of the poles produce fluid, undulating movement as the poles seem to sway and flex, blending the mechanical with the natural. Moving ambiguously, the poles at times appear to rotate in opposite directions and at others in the same direction. As the sculpture moves and as one’s vantage point changes, the relationship between the two poles also seems to change, as they visually weave together then separate, shifting the space between them." - Storm King Art Center

 

 Image Courtesy of Alan Tansey

Image Courtesy of Alan Tansey